Triumph 1943 to 1949

Triumph 1943 to 1949

 

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Triumph the legend

Triumph Speed Twin

Triumph Tiger 100

 

1943-1946 – Triumph 1943 to 1949


 

In mid-1943 Jack Sangster offered Turner to return to Triumph an increase in shareholding in the company. The war was in its final stage and Turner was already looking at the future, producing only two-cylinder engines.

Triumph 1943 a 1949

Bill Johnson and Edward Turner | Triumph 1943 to 1949

When the end of the war finally came, Great Britain had been badly damaged, which encouraged existing companies to look for markets outside the country and ensure its subsistence. Turner definitively presented the 3T 350 to offer cylinder options together with the T 100 and the Speed ​​Twin.

At the beginning of 1945 Bill Johnson became the official distributor of Triumph in the USA. From now on, the success of the brand was totally united to the United States, where the demand for the twin-cylinder during 1950 always exceeded the offer.

In mid-1943 Jack Sangster offered Turner to return to Triumph an increase in shareholding in the company. The war was in its final stage and Turner was already looking at the future, producing only two-cylinder engines.

 

Tiger 100 and  Speed Twin 500 cc  1945-1946


 

With the production back on track, the T 100 once again became the flagship of the brand. The upgrade for this stage included a new crankcase, a dynamo mounted on the front and a Thompson & Houston magneto on the rear.

Unlike the Speed ​​Twin, the Tiger maintained its highest compression ratio as it did before the war and the carburetor was still a 1-inch Amal. The silencers were shared with the Speed ​​Twin.

In addition to the engine upgrades, the most important was made in the front suspension, a telescopic fork and hydraulic damping was installed, these first forks were quite rudimentary but more attractive, the problem is that they suffered leaks.

Triumph 1943 a 1949

Advertising of T100 in 1946 | Triumph 1943 to 1949

With the new fork, a 19-inch wheel was installed, keeping the rear part rigid. Other updates were to place a new handlebar to better adapt to the new telescopic fork.

The new front end changed the style of the bike, but in this process, the simplicity of the prewar models changed and the T100 lost the beauty of the years 1939 and 1940.

For these years it was logical to have some uniformity in the range of models and the new Speed ​​Twin 500 cc incorporated all updates of the Tiger100, but the compression ratio was lowered to 6.5: 1 to adapt to British gasoline of low octane. Without losing the red color amaranth characteristic of the model the new Speed ​​Twin was identical to the T100.

The demand for both models continued very strong throughout 1947, there were no major updates. During 1947 production reached 12,000 units, 60% was manufactured for export.

Turner always believed in the future of the American market, and this year Bill Johnson began to establish a national dealer network throughout the US.

During this period the production of the 3T model began.

The new front end changed the style of the bike, but in this process, the simplicity of the prewar models changed and the T100 lost the beauty of the years 1939 and 1940.

 

3T 350cc – Triumph 1943 to 1949


 

With the 3T, Turner continued with its intention to maintain some uniformity in the design of product range, the 3T was basically a Speed ​​Twin but with a smaller engine, evidently it was never very fast, in a 1946 speed test it reached the 120 km / h.

Triumph 1943 a 1949

T3 350cc | Triumph 1943 to 1949

Johnson imported the 3T to the US until 1951, it was never as popular as its older sisters. Over those years also suffered updates, his style was a carbon copy of the 5T with the incorporation of the instrument panel and a redesign of the fuel tank in 1950.

The Deluxe model, incorporating all-black finishes and a smaller fuel tank, was never a success, in the USA only 3 units were imported in 1951 and in 1952 it was eliminated from the catalog.

The Deluxe model, incorporating all-black finishes and a smaller fuel tank, was never a success, in the USA only 3 units were imported in 1951 and in 1952 it was eliminated from the catalog.

 

T100 and Speed Twin 500 cc 1948-1949


 

Updates for this year included new fenders, the front with removable front seals and the rear without side handles. A new rear license plate and a new rear light support. Due to the lack of components, updates were made throughout 1948.

The gradual evolution of the T100 and the Speed ​​Twin led to the replacement of the instrument panel of the fuel tank to the housing of the headlight, this was the hallmark of the Triumph until the mid-60s.

Instead of the instrument panel on the tank an optional luggage rack was installed. The most important engine update was the increase in the compression ratio and the introduction of a Vokes air filter. The dynamo was increased to 60 watts. The capacity of the oil tank was reduced and the lid was replaced by a screw.

The gradual evolution of the T100 and the Speed ​​Twin led to the replacement of the instrument panel of the fuel tank to the housing of the headlight, this was the hallmark of the Triumph until the mid-60s.

 

TR5 Trophy 500 – Triumph 1943 to 1949


 

During 1948 it was decided to compete in the six-day Trial of San Remo, for which 3 motorcycles were built based on the 5T and some components of the Grand Prix. Henry Vale built the bikes and won 3 gold medals.

The results were very good but the riders were not so happy because although the motorcycles were fast and reliable, were very heavy and difficult to ride.

Triumph 1943 a 1949

TR5 Trophy 500cc | Triumph 1943 to 1949

The TR5 appeared on the Earls Court Motorcycle Show in November 1948 and production began in January 1949. The TR5 was shorter than the 1948 version and was the base model for the triumphs of the competition in the following three years. The gear ratio was long and the TR5 received a completely new frame, shorter than any of the brand’s bikes.

The TR5 was the only dual purpose motorcycle in the world, light and tall enough to get off the road.

In 1950 the rest of the motorcycles of the brand had a considerable update; the TR5 continued being the same without changes all the year. The 1950 TR5 was the last bike to feature a chrome gas tank until the Royal Wedding T140 of 1982.

In the US it quickly became popular with off road driving fans and was the key to raising the profile of the brand.

The TR5 was the only dual purpose motorcycle in the world, light and tall enough to get off the road.

 

 

 

Source: “Triumph motorcycles 1937-today” of Ian Falloon

Klauer & Iannuzzi | 2019 | Triumph 1943 to 1949