Triumph 1960-1962

Triumph 1960-1962

 

 

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Triumph 1943 to 1949

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Triumph Bonneville    

 

 

1960

Triumph 1960-1962

 

After a great year, in 1960 there is a sudden drop in motorcycle sales in the United Kingdom. This forces Triumph to allocate more resources in the US market, indeed the American market had been his lifesaver when sales in Europe were not enough and this situation was not going to be different.

Triumph 1960-1962

Honda advertising | Triumph 1960-1962

The big problem this time, was that its American distributors were more demanding and both JoMo and Tricor began to claim a huge amount of individualizations. These changes included modifications to seats, color scheme, adjustments to the engine, chassis, fenders and a few more variations.

Controlling all these variations made it very difficult to comply with quality standards that had been self-imposed by the brand, which generated reliability and warranty claims from this year.

In addition, a new competitor began to play in the market, one that gradually gained the respect of customers and other companies in the sector and that finally produced a revolution in the motorcycle world, Japan.

In addition, a new competitor began to play in the market, one that gradually gained the respect of customers and other companies in the sector and that finally produced a revolution in the motorcycle world, Japan.

 

 

The threat is real. Triumph 1960-1962

Triumph 1960-1962

 

On a trip made by Turner this year to know what he was facing, it was enough to get very worried, the technology of the Japanese industrial plants was amazing and the speed of their engineers to develop and produce motorcycles scared. High quality and performance were also characteristics of an unbeatable competitor.

Triumph 1960-1962

Honda Benly Super Sport 1961 | Triumph 1960-1962

Turner knew that Japanese motorcycles were better, but the new competitors were concentrated in vehicles of less than 300cc, and did not believe that they were going to invade territory of motorcycles of greater power, consciously or unconsciously Triumph decided to ignore this threat, in addition, to face this challenge needed enthusiasm, courage and decision, Turner, 60 years old, could not face this challenge. Turner seemed not to be the best person to take Triumph to a new and more competitive era.

In the meantime, it worked as usual, with annual updates of the existing models that he considered sufficient to face any foreign threat.

On a trip made by Turner this year to know what he was facing, it was enough to get very worried, the technology of the Japanese industrial plants was amazing and the speed of their engineers to develop and produce motorcycles scared. High quality and performance were also characteristics of an unbeatable competitor.

 

 

1961

Tirumph 1960-1962

 

This year was one of the most important in the history of Triumph, Jack Sangster leaves the presidency of the BSA group and names Eric Turner as successor (without any relationship with Edward), an accountant who tries to rationalize the operations of both BSA and Triumph.

For his part, Charles Granfield retires as chief designer and Edward Turner convinces Bert Hopwood to take over General Management from Norton. Hopwood is fully involved in the design and development of the three-cylinder Trident.

The British motorcycle market still did not wake up, aggravated by the economic climate that did not help, added to the tax increases that applied to the sector and the bad reputation that began to take shape with the Café racer movement.

Now more than ever, the viability of the company depends on the US market, for this reason exclusive models were manufactured for America.

The British motorcycle market still did not wake up, aggravated by the economic climate that did not help, added to the tax increases that applied to the sector and the bad reputation that began to take shape with the Café racer movement.

 

 

1962

Triumph 1960-1962

 

Pressed by the crisis that continues to threaten the company, Turner hires the consulting firm McKinsey to study the rationalization of the company, McKinsey recommends joining Triumph and BSA, this generates many problems with the syndicate, this decision would continue to generate conflicts over the next decade.

Triumph 1960-1962

Scooter Triumph Tina advertising | Triumph 1960-1962

This year the Tina scooter is launched, with a two-stroke engine and 100cc, Triumph allocates many resources for the development of this vehicle, the final product is quite innovative and ingenious, incorporates automatic transmission.

Like many Turner developments, the vehicle is launched on the market and has not been tested enough, the brand takes many years to perfect until finally achieved in 1965, for those years the fever for scooters is over.

Honda seriously threatened the lower power motorcycle market in the US, in 1962 it sold more motorcycles than the rest of the market together. The T20 Tiger Cub was in trouble, Triumph tries to face the Japanese threat by widening the range of offer in this segment of the market by developing deep updates, but it is too late, this year half of the previous one is sold, and the end of the T20 is approaching.

This year the Tina scooter is launched, with a two-stroke engine and 100cc, Triumph allocates many resources for the development of this vehicle, the final product is quite innovative and ingenious, incorporates automatic transmission.

 

 

Pragmatism. Triumph 1960-1962

Triumph 1960-1962

 

The construction of the C range of two cylinders had been unified since 1957, and BSA already had its A65 unified to roll, now it would be the turn of Turner’s parallel twin-cylinder. Obviously the unification would bring an amazing cost reduction to the company and add simplicity to the manufacturing operation.

Triumph Trident 750cc | Triumph 1960-1962

It took 8 months for Turner and Hopwood to have the new 650cc engine ready. Using many of the components of the predecessor unit, this new development would incorporate significant updates, rigid crankcases, a new aluminum cylinder head, the crankshaft received a lighter flywheel and the magnet disappeared, all 650cc engines would have coil ignition. However, the attractive previous shape of the gearbox and the distribution chest remained, details that would continue to give beauty to the new engine.

Doug Hele joined Triumph as a development engineer. Hele had left Norton after his Birmingham factory closed, and one of his first projects in Triumph was to plan the 750cc Trident with Bert Hopwood. Hele would also have a great impact on the development of the Bonneville, making gradual improvements in motorcycle driving that contributed to Triumph’s success during the 1960s and established it as the most iconic British sports motorcycle of the time.

The construction of the C range of two cylinders had been unified since 1957, and BSA already had its A65 unified to roll, now it would be the turn of Turner’s parallel twin-cylinder. Obviously the unification would bring an amazing cost reduction to the company and add simplicity to the manufacturing operation.

 

 

 

 

Source: “Triumph motorcycles 1937-today” of Ian Falloon

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